Upcoming Exhibitions

Coal Country
Opening Reception: February 1, 2018 from 6 – 8 p.m.
February 1 – August 12, 2018

The southern Appalachian region was built on the back of coal. Generations of miners blasted their way into the mountainsides of Appalachia on their quest for rich veins of black diamonds and, wherever that treasure was found, communities sprang up around them. These company towns, or coal camps, were entirely self-sufficient. There were company houses, company stores, hospitals, churches, dance halls, even baseball teams. This exhibit examines the culture of coal in Appalachia—the towns built by the coal companies and the lives of the people who  called those towns home.


Suzanne Stryk
Opening Reception: March 1, 2018 from 6 – 8 p.m.
March 1 – July, 2018

For more than 25 years, Suzanne Stryk has recorded her experiences with nature in sketchbooks that are both journals of walks near her Bristol, Virginia, home and scientific documents of the flora and fauna she observes. These pages have served as foundations for hundreds of mixed-media works that blend the natural history of a place with Stryk’s own direct experiences with each environment. In her new series, Notes on the State of Virginia, based on Thomas Jefferson’s 1781 book detailing Virginia’s diverse animal and plant populations, Stryk has created more than two dozen place-based assemblages detailing her own travels through the state and the flora and fauna she observed on her journey.


Touching the Sacred
Opening Reception: April 5, 2018 from 6 – 8 p.m.
March 30 – September 16, 2018

Inspired by faith, the holy imagery has long been a part of many religions. These gloriously creative representations of the stories and holy beings began as a teaching device for the believers, many of whom were unable to read.

Touching the Sacred focuses on imagery from two branches of Christianity – the Orthodox and the Catholic traditions and how the depictions developed by each are similar and how they differ.

These depictions range from paintings of saints, angels, and the Holy Family on canvas, wood, bronze, and tin panels, to carvings of them completely in wood or with modeled heads and hands and cloth bodies which were sumptuously clothed.

Over the centuries, these venerated representations of holiness have evolved from teaching tools into a sacred art form.

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